Model Village

16mm, colour, optical sound, or HD transfer, 5'

Model Village

Lucy Harris, 2016/17
Sound: Sybella Perry

A cinematic investigation into perspective, scale and observation, Model Village explores what place the pastoral Alpine idyll holds in the imagination.

The model village’s mysterious past is explored via a found photo album, postcards, sound and field recordings.

Are we the observer or is it us who are being observed?

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Form and Flight (Part of the trilogy ‘A Natural Vision’)

16mm, black & white, HD transfer, silent, 3'30"

Form and Flight film still

Lucy Harris, 2015

Natural Vision, Form and Flight and Lunar Visions playfully explore the way our engagement with the natural world has been informed by the framing of nature by art.

From the framing of the landscape by British romantic painting through the experiments of modernism, Natural Vision and Form and Flight ask us to think again about the way perspective and the phenomena of nature are colonised and represented to us through visual trickery. The films give an altered vision of landscape in an extended inquiry into perspective and how landscapes are creatively perceived, constructed and altered through the medium of (16mm) film via illusion, framing and exposure.

Form and Flight was installed with the other two films of the trilogy A Natural Vision as part of A Murmuration (2015) at ONCA gallery, Brighton and at the Lookout, Aldeburgh (2016) as a single screen work.

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Lunar Visions (Part of the trilogy ‘A Natural Vision’)

16mm black & white & colour, HD transfer, silent, 5'

Lunar Visions

Lucy Harris 2015

Natural Vision, Form and Flight and Lunar Visions playfully explore the way our engagement with the natural world has been informed by the framing of nature by art.

Lunar Visions explores the moon as an ‘imagined’ environment – a site for invention, experienced primarily through photography and film. Fascination with the moon is present, for instance, in cinema’s earliest experiments (Méliès). Very few people will ever experience it directly, and yet we think we know the moon’s surface and its geography.

Combining archive film and new material shot on location and in the studio, this film combines early cinema’s illusionary techniques with a reworking of familiar images (moonscapes), reconstructed scenes (smoke clouds, paper moons) and the idea of flight (birds/Brancusi’s bird sculptures) to investigate the fantasy that frames exploration.

Lunar Visions was installed with the other two films of the trilogy A Natural Vision as part of A Murmuration (2015) at ONCA gallery, Brighton and at the Lookout, Aldeburgh (2016) as a projected installation.

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Natural Vision (Part of the trilogy ‘A Natural Vision’)

16mm black & white or HD transfer, 3'

Natural Vision film still

Lucy Harris, 2011/2015
Sound: Sybella Perry

Natural Vision is a study in perspective – comparing obscured landscapes of mist, clouds and light with constructed landscapes of rocks, parsley and paper. It is inspired by Degas’ use of tissue models for clouds, Constable’s trees of broccoli and the rocks and stones used to depict mountain landscapes in Italian Renaissance painting.

The film gives an altered vision of landscape with its continued inquiry into perspective and how landscapes are creatively perceived, constructed and altered through the medium of 16mm film via illusion, framing and exposure.

The sound for Natural Vision is composed of field recordings and birdsong, with music from found reel-to-reel tapes. It responds to the film’s romantic imagery and the pursuit of the landscape painter, in their attempt to replicate a natural scene through the use of improvised objects.

Natural Vision was installed with the other two films of the trilogy A Natural Vision as part of A Murmuration (2015) at ONCA gallery, Brighton in a modified silent version.

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Constructed Landscapes (part 1)

16mm hand tinted colour archive film, separate audio, 3'30"

Constructed landscapes part 1

Lucy Harris, 2015

An assembled found footage landscape using an expanded palette, accompanied by a composition of field recordings from Derek Taylor’s sound archive.

The Grand Tour

16mm double screen, colour, separate audio 3'30"

Grand Tour film still

Lucy Harris, 2014
Sound: Sybella Perry

The Grand Tour, filmed in Paestum, Italy, is recreated in a South London garden using DIY model sets and postcard backdrops.

Harris’ continuing fascination with optical illusion is playfully presented – from the ancient Greeks’ original interest in shifting perspectives to miniature landscapes conjured from postcards, scissors and film.

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Crossing Points

16mm, colour, optical sound, or HD transfer, 13'40"

Crossing Points film still

Lucy Harris, 2012/13
Composer: Andrew Lovett

Filmed in the 1936 Berlin Olympia Stadium and the Kuppelsaal, Crossing Points exploits the interplay between memory, history and architecture.

Interweaving images of the empty venues with sequences of two fencers performing a series of choreographed gestures, a dialogue is created between architectural sites of historical significance and legacy.

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Exhibitions 

The tongue shapes words all too quickly
Group exhibition, April 2014
Triangle Space, Chelsea College of Arts
Curated by Vicky Falconer and Irena Kalođera

Contemporary Projected Images
Group exhibition, December 2013
Robert Capa Contemporary Photography Centre, Budapest, Hungary
Curated by Balázs Telek

After Image
Group exhibition and screening, December 2012,
Lo & Behold, London
Curated by Lucy Harris and Sarah Wood

Cremer

16mm, black & white, optical sound, or HD transfer, 7'40"

Cremer

David Leister and Lucy Harris, 2013

Cremer is an abstract document of a lost studio, not easily categorised, occupying the spaces between a photograph, a document and a film. It is a collaborative record and examination of a fire and resulting smoke damage that took place in the studio in 2006. As film is exposed to light, the studio was exposed to smoke, leaving a shadow or imprint on all surfaces, almost appearing as ‘x-ray’ images.

In the time that’s elapsed since making the film there is also now a broader suggestion of the current demise of film as a material. The work holds multiple meanings in its subject, image and surface.

Whilst melancholy in tone, and a lament to the loss of the studio and all its related filmmaking elements, it also points to film’s ultimate resistance to destruction.

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Sideways

16mm, black & white, optical sound, 3'30"

Sideways

Lucy Harris, 2006

Located in a proscribed area of London Sideways explores the shadows of surrounding buildings to construct a secondary city landscape. By inverting the urban environment, the camera searches and reveals traces that commonly go unnoticed, creating forms from light and dark. Detailed surfaces and textures of the city’s fabric create a filmed drawing with a musical structure exposing transitory spaces.

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Greensplat

Video, sound, 1'37"

Lucy Harris, 2004

Filmed in Greensplat, (a Cornish tin-mining area) the film explores constructed landscapes. The text from Kenneth Clark’s book Landscape into Art (1949) highlights the influences behind notions of ideal landscapes, as the tools of construction are revealed in the landscape viewed.

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